cobalt ore encyclopedia

nickel ore encyclopedia - whitehillstree.com

Cobalt . The Canadian Encyclopedia. Feb 6, 2006 . Small quantities of cobalt are also recovered from copper nickel sulphide ores. The latter, which are the source of most of the world's nickel, are. Contact US Nickel . Encyclopedia . So they called the fake copper ore Old Nick's copper. Since then, nickel has become a very valuable metal.

Cobalt | Article about Cobalt by The Free Dictionary

Cobalt minerals are rare and do not form any significant accumulations of ore. Nickel ores, which contain cobalt as an impurity, are the main source for the industrial extraction of cobalt. The processing of these ores is extremely complex, and the method used depends on the composition of the ore.

Cobalt - New World Encyclopedia

Cobalt (chemical symbol Co, atomic number 27) is a hard, lustrous, silver-gray metal.It is found in various ores and is important as a trace element in the human body.It is used in the preparation of wear-resistant, high-strength alloys, magnetic media, and battery electrodes. It is a catalyst for various chemical reactions and is useful for electroplating.

Cobalt extraction - Wikipedia

Copper-nickel cobaltiferous ore deposits are located in Krasnoiarsk Krai (Noril'sk) and on the Kola Peninsula in the USSR and in the sulfide copper-nickel deposits of Canada. Oxidized cobalt ores also belong to the complex ore group. They are formed during surface erosion of cobalt- and nickel-containing hyperbasic rocks or sulfur ores.

Cobalt (Ont) | The Canadian Encyclopedia

Oct 18, 2012· Cobalt, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1907, population 1133 (2011c), 1224 (2006c). The Town of Cobalt, located about 480 km north of Toronto near the Québec border and Lake Timiskaming, lies between the clay belt to the north around New Liskeard and the heavily forested area of …

Ontario | The Canadian Encyclopedia

Ontario is divided by three of Canada's seven physiographic regions: the Hudson Bay Lowlands, the Canadian Shield and the St. Lawrence Lowlands.Agriculture, as well as most of the population, is concentrated in the south. By comparison, Northern Ontario, with nearly 90 per cent of the land, contains only six per cent of the population.

Cobalt - Wikipedia

With few exceptions, cobalt ore is not usually mined for the cobalt content. Rather, it is often recovered as a by-product from the mining of ores of iron, nickel, copper, silver, manganese, zinc, and arsenic, which contain traces of cobalt.Complex processing is required to concentrate and extract cobalt …

Cobalt blue | pigment | Britannica.com

Other articles where Cobalt blue is discussed: cobalt processing: History: …as pigments to impart a blue colour to porcelain and glass. It was not until 1742, however, that a Swedish chemist, Georg Brandt, showed that the blue colour was due to a previously unidentified metal, cobalt.

New Caledonia | French unique collectivity, Pacific Ocean ...

New Caledonia, French unique collectivity in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, about 900 miles (1,500 km) east of Australia. It includes the island of New Caledonia (the Grande Terre [Mainland]), where the capital, Nouméa, is located; the Loyalty Islands; the Bélep Islands; and the Île des Pins.

Cobalt - WikiMili, The Free Encyclopedia

Cobalt is a chemical element with the symbol Co and atomic number 27. Like nickel, cobalt is found in the Earth's crust only in chemically combined form, save for small deposits found in alloys of natural meteoric iron. The free element, produced by reductive smelting, is a hard, lustrous, silver-gr

Cobaltore Onagawa - Wikipedia

Cobaltore Onagawa (コバルトーレ, Cobaltore Onagawa) is a football (soccer) club based in Onagawa, the main and only city forming the Oshika District, which is located in Miyagi Prefecture in Japan. They play in the Tohoku Soccer League, which is part of Japanese Regional Leagues.The name Cobaltore comes from the combination of two Spanish words: cobalto, referring to cobalt blue ...

Cobalt - Academic Kids

Cobalt was known in ancient times through its compounds, which would color glass a rich blue.. George Brandt (1694-1768) is credited with the discovery of cobalt. The date of discovery varies depending on the source, but is between 1730 and 1737.He was able to show that cobalt was the source of the blue color in glasses, which previously had been attributed to the bismuth found with cobalt.

Element 27 | Article about Element 27 by The Free Dictionary

Cobalt minerals are rare and do not form any significant accumulations of ore. Nickel ores, which contain cobalt as an impurity, are the main source for the industrial extraction of cobalt. The processing of these ores is extremely complex, and the method used depends on the composition of the ore.

Cobalt - Wikipedia

Cobalt is a chemical element with the symbol Co and atomic number 27. Like nickel, cobalt is found in the Earth's crust only in chemically combined form, save for small deposits found in alloys of natural meteoric iron.The free element, produced by reductive smelting, is a hard, lustrous, silver-gray metal.

Nickel | Encyclopedia.com

Nickel is classified as a transition metal. Transition metals are elements between Groups 2 (metals) and 13 (non-metals) in the periodic table.The periodic table is a chart that shows how chemical elements are related to one another. Nickel is closely related to iron, cobalt, copper, and zinc. These metals are close to nickel in the periodic table.

Cobalt - chemeurope.com

The word cobalt is derived from the German kobalt, from kobold meaning "goblin", a term used for the ore of cobalt by miners. The first attempts at smelting the cobalt ores to produce cobalt metal failed, yielding cobalt(II) oxide instead; ... ^ Encyclopedia Britannica Online.

Talk:Cobalt - Wikipedia

says "Cobalt-60 is a commercially important radioisotope, used as a radioactive tracer and for the production of high energy gamma rays." My experience of the use of cobalt isotopes is that it is cobalt-57 which is used as a tracer in medical applications, not cobalt-60.

Chromium | Encyclopedia.com

An alloy of nickel and chromium, often called Nichrome, is widely used as a heating element in electric toasters, coffeepots, and other appliances. Stellite is an extremely hard alloy of cobalt, chromium, and tungsten, with small amounts of iron, silicon, and carbon; it is used in metal cutting tools and for wear-resistant surfaces.

Cobalt : Wikis (The Full Wiki)

Cobalt-based colors and pigments have been used since ancient times for jewelry and paints, and miners have long used the name kobold ore for some minerals. Cobalt occurs in various metallic-lustered ores, for example cobaltite (CoAsS), but is mainly produced as …

COBALT – Encyclopaedia Iranica

Cobalt in Persia. Identifications of cobalt in Persian blue glass and glazes are relatively few, but it is generally assumed that a deep blue color, usually identified as "azure" by early European travelers, betrays its presence, whereas greenish or turquoise blue is usually owing to the presence of copper.

Cobalt Facts for Kids - Kiddle encyclopedia

The word cobalt is derived from the German kobalt, from kobold meaning "goblin", a superstitious term used for the ore of cobalt by miners. The first attempts to smelt those ores for copper or nickel failed, yielding simply powder (cobalt(II) oxide) instead. Because the primary ores of cobalt always contain arsenic, smelting the ore oxidized the arsenic into the highly toxic and volatile ...

Cobaltite | Encyclopedia.com

cobaltite (kō´bôltīt, kōbôl´tīt), opaque, silver-white, sometimes reddish or grayish mineral of the pyrite group, a compound of cobalt, arsenic, and sulfur, CoAsS. It occurs in crystals of the cubic system, also in compact to granular masses. It is an important ore of cobalt, found chiefly in …

Cobalt - encyclopedia article - Citizendium

The word cobalt is derived from the German kobalt, from kobold meaning "goblin", a term used for the ore of cobalt by miners, who thought it worthless and who found that it was poisonous and that it polluted and degraded other mined elements, ... ↑ Encyclopedia Britannica Online.